Affiliate Disclosure
FTC Disclosure Rules






Disclosure Notice
If you choose to visit one of the courses we review via our website and make a purchase, we may recieve a commission; however we do not allow this to interfere with our rating and review process. We never accept paid reviews and each product is thoroughly tested by us. All opinions offered here are our own.
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FTC Disclosure Rules

				

These rules only apply to you if you have created a special review page for our products and have given our products your personal reccomendation with your signature. If you are using only our affiliate text links and banners on your website, then these rules do not apply to you. If you are promoting our products to your email subscribers list, then these rules DO apply to you. An example of what you could use is the "Disclosure" statement that you see above the bookmark on this page, which you should add to the top of each page of the email promotions that you send to your email subcribers. If you're still not sure what to do, feel free to send us an e-mail and include your phone number contacts and the best times you can be reached and our affiliate manager will be glad to call you and explain to you these guidelines. We are responsible that our affiliates are in compliance with the new FTC Guidelines, so if you haven’t already, it’s ESSENTIAL that YOU SEND AN EMAIL statement to me that says: 1. I have read through the FTC Guidelines and watched the FTC Videos. 2. I agree to comply with the Guidelines. You can view the FTC videos directly on the FTC website at: http://www.ftc.gov/multimedia/video/business/endorsement-guides.shtm
Another important FTC webpage explaining the new Guidelines is found at http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/business/adv/bus71.shtm
We have copied a few of the most important guidelines that affect Affiliates below. While these are to help you understand the Guidelines, please take the time to read through and watch the links provided. Please read all of the below information carefully and then reply to this message, including the two statements above in your response. None of these regulations are very daunting – mostly involving common sense, honesty, and good business practices – but it is your job to understand and abide by them. If you have any questions about how to comply, please get in touch with me,so I can help you. So, please read the terms at the end of this message. Where and how to place your Disclosure? A button or link that re-directs to a separate page or pop-up is unfortunately not acceptable. The Disclosure needs to be in full view and on the same page as your review of YCPG. This is taken directly from the FTC website: Would a button that says DISCLOSURE, LEGAL, or something like that be sufficient disclosure? No. A button isn’t likely to be sufficient. How often do you click on those buttons when you visit someone else’s site? If you provide the information as part of your message, your audience is less likely to miss it. When the product review has a clear and conspicuous disclosure of your relationship – and the reader can see both the product review and the link at the same time – readers have the information they need. If the product review and the link are separated, the reader may lose the connection. As for where to place a disclosure, the guiding principle is that it has to be clear and conspicuous. Putting disclosures in obscure places – for example, buried on an ABOUT US or GENERAL INFO page, behind a poorly labeled hyperlink or in a terms of service agreement – isn’t good enough. The average person who visits your site must be able to notice your disclosure, read it and understand it. To define a personal endorsement, this is anything that says or implies you have seen/used the product and recommend it. E.g. “I love YCPG, it’s the best guitar course available and I recommend you go buy it too”. If using our supplied reviews and testimonials this is not permitted. Your disclosure must also be include in all promotional emails that you send to your subscribers. FTC Guidelines/Q&A – from the FTC website When there exists a connection between the endorser and the seller of the advertised product that might materially affect the weight or credibility of the endorsement (i.e., the connection is not reasonably expected by the audience), such connection must be fully disclosed AND disclosed in a visible place. Endorsements must reflect the honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experience of the endorser. Furthermore, an endorsement may not convey any express or implied representation that would be deceptive if made directly by the advertiser. 1. What are the essential things I need to know about using endorsements in advertising? The most important principle is that an endorsement has to represent the accurate experience and opinion of the endorser: • You can’t talk about your experience with a product if you haven’t tried it. • If you were paid to try a product and you thought it was terrible, you can’t say it’s terrific. • You can’t make claims about a product that would require proof you don’t have. For example, you can’t say a product will cure a particular disease if there isn’t scientific evidence to prove that’s true. 2. I’m an affiliate marketer with links to an online retailer on my website. When people click on those links and buy something from the retailer, I earn a commission. A. What do I have to disclose? Let’s assume that you’re endorsing a product or service on your site and you have links to a company that pays you commissions on sales. If you disclose the relationship clearly and conspicuously on your site, readers can decide how much weight to give your endorsement. In some instances, where the link is embedded in the product review, a single disclosure may be adequate. When the product review has a clear and conspicuous disclosure of your relationship – and the reader can see both the product review and the link at the same time – readers have the information they need. If the product review and the link are separated, the reader may lose the connection. B. Where do I place the disclosure? As for where to place a disclosure, the guiding principle is that it has to be clear and conspicuous. Putting disclosures in obscure places – for example, buried on an ABOUT US or GENERAL INFO page, behind a poorly labeled hyperlink or in a terms of service agreement – isn’t good enough. The average person who visits your site must be able to notice your disclosure, read it and understand it. C. Would a single disclosure on my home page that “many of the products I discuss on this site are provided to me free by their manufacturer” be enough? A single disclosure doesn’t really do it because people visiting your site might read individual reviews or watch individual videos without seeing the disclosure on your home page. D. Is there special language I have to use to make the disclosure? No. The point is to give readers the information. Your disclosure could be as simple as “Company X gave me this product to try . . ..” E. Do I have to hire a lawyer to help me write a disclosure? No. What matters is effective communication, not legalese. A disclosure like “Company Xsent me [name of product] to try, and I think it’s great” gives your readers the information they need. Or, at the start of a short video, you might say, “Some of the products I’m going to use in this video were sent to me by their manufacturers.” That gives the necessary heads-up to your viewers. D. Would a button that says DISCLOSURE, LEGAL, or something like that be sufficient disclosure? No. A button isn’t likely to be sufficient. How often do you click on those buttons when you visit someone else’s site? If you provide the information as part of your message, your audience is less likely to miss it. 3. Where can I find out more? The revised Guides offer more than 35 examples of how they apply in practical settings. The FTC also has produced to-the-point video clips discussing some of the issues on marketers’ minds. Questions? Send them to endorsements@ftc.gov. The FTC works to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them. Visit ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261 Affiliate Manager http://www.guitartabbooks.com/idevaffiliate